CES 2013: LaCie Introduces New 20TB Thunderbolt and NAS Products

LaCie introduced a pair of high-capacity storage devices at CES today.

The first, the LaCie 5big is a 10 or 20TB external RAID box connected via Thunderbolt. The box includes five drives with multiple RAID options for backup and speed, as well as a pair of Thunderbolt ports for daisy chaining. The box is $2,199 in 20TB configuration, and $1,199 for the 10TB version.

5bigTB intro
LaCie also introduced the 5big NAS Pro, a gigabit ethernet equipped network storage box available in multiple capacities: 0TB (diskless) for $529, 10TB for $1,199, and 20TB for $2,199.

Today LaCie announced the 5big NAS Pro, its latest high-performance 5-bay network-attached storage solution powered by Intel®. Thanks to hybrid cloud technology, the LaCie 5big NAS Pro lets employees collaborate easily using a single interface for both network/cloud storage and remote access. Plus, data stays secure thanks to novice-friendly SimplyRAID and client-side cloud encryption.

With transfer speeds up to 200MB/s*, the LaCie 5big NAS Pro boosts business productivity. Powered by a dual-core 2.13GHz Intel 64-bit Atom™ processor and 4GB RAM, it also features dual LAN and link aggregation for optimized network speeds. This performance-driven combination accelerates file sharing, remote access, and backups for small businesses.

The 5big Thunderbolt drive is available for order from LaCie today, while LaCie is taking sign ups to be notified when the 5big NAS Pro is available.

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How Safari Pretended to Be Mozilla Before It Was Released

Former Apple employee Don Melton is sharing a unique look behind the scenes of the Safari development team. Melton was the team leader on both the Safari and WebKit products that are now used by millions of users on both iOS, the Mac, and Windows.NewImage

Previously, Melton explained how the Safari name came about, but today he shares the tale of Safari’s User Agent string and the strategies his team used to keep the project under wraps.

Twitter and Facebook didn’t exist then. Nobody at Apple was stupid enough to blog about work, so what was I worried about?

Server logs. They scared the hell out of me.

When a Web browser fetches a page from a Web server, the browser identifies itself to that server with a user agent string — basically its name, version, platform, etc. The browser also gives the server an IP address so the server knows where to return the page. This exchange not only makes the Web work, it also allows the server to tell who is using what browser and where they’re using it.

You can see where this is going, right? But wait, there’s more…

Back around 1990, some forward-thinking IT person secured for Apple an entire Class A network of IP addresses. That’s right, Apple has 16,777,216 static IP addresses. And because all of these addresses belong together — in what’s now called a “/8 block” — every one of them starts with the same number. In Apple’s case, the number is 17.

IP address 17.149.160.49? That’s Apple. 17.1.2.3? Yes, Apple. 17.18.19.20? Also, Apple. 17.253.254.255? Apple, dammit!

I was so screwed.

Melton’s blog has the rest of the details about how his team kept things quiet before the big reveal.

Frog Design’s Hartmut Esslinger Reveals Early Apple Designs in New Book

Designboom (via The Verge) today got a hold of some photographs of early Apple computer designs from Hartmut Esslinger’s new book, Design Forward.

Esslinger founded Frog Design, the company that Apple partnered with in the 1980s and ’90s to come up with a design strategy. Frog Design was responsible for the Apple IIc, which led to the “Snow White” design language that persisted in Apple products through 1990.

This was the stylization that originally included off-white or platinum coloration, vertical and horizontal stripes for decoration, and a three-dimensional logo inlaid into the product case.

Frog Design also worked on several other prospective Apple products, which were never manufactured, including a telephone/tablet hybrid deemed the “Macphone,” a simple, small-screened computer with a wireless mouse and keyboard, named the “Baby Mac,” and a set of tall, space-aged computers called “Macintosh Studies.”

Macphone

Baby Mac

Macintosh Studies
Designboom has a full range of pictures of 10 different conceptual product designs available, along with a few excerpts of text from the book.

Design Forward, Esslinger’s Book will be released on January 16, 2013.

New 27″ iMac Not Compatible With VESA Mounts

Apple has long supported VESA mounting brackets for its larger displays, including the 27″ iMac, the 27″ Thunderbolt and 24″ and 30″ Cinema Displays. With Apple’s adapter bracket, the desk stand can be removed and the display can be attached to any VESA-compatible mount.

Imacwallmount
However, the new, thinner 27″ iMac, does not support VESA mounting according to an email from Apple obtained by MacTrast. This is also noted in a compatibility note for the Apple VESA Mount Adapter Kit on the Apple Online Store.

Hi Glenn,

Thank you for your inquiry. The new iMac is not VESA mount compatible at this time.

We appreciate your feedback on this feature and will take it into consideration.

Thanks,
Laura

iMac owners frequently mount their machines to wall brackets for use as kiosks or other commercial displays, or to attach them to an articulating wall mount for flexible placement.

(Photo courtesy Flickr/Jaysin Trevino)

The Origins of the Name ‘Safari’

Former Apple employee Don Melton has shared a unique look behind the scenes of the Safari development team. Melton was the team leader on both the Safari and WebKit products that are now used by millions of users on both iOS, the Mac, and Windows.NewImage

The name Safari, however, wasn’t decided on until less than a month before the browser was originally launched. A number of different names were suggested, including ‘Freedom’, but none of them seemed right.

The name ‘iBrowse’ was used sarcastically within the team, though it was never used within the code. The development code name for Safari was ‘Alexander’.

From that point on, we had a brief discussion about the product name at random HI design sessions every month. Again, I don’t remember any particular name we talked about. They all sounded so awful to me that I’ve purged from my mind the trauma of imagining the browser being labeled with any of them. And the candidate names seemed to get worse the closer we got to shipping.

I’m not sure if any of the names I heard came from Steve after that initial session. I think he doomed some group in Marketing to iterate on them for awhile. And the few names I proposed were stinkers too. No one was without sin here.

Finally I stopped thinking about it because of more important things to worry about — like actually getting the engineering done.

In the end, the name ‘Safari’ was chosen and the rest is history.

Alfred 2.0 to Add More Complex Functions Via ‘Workflows’

Alfred is a beloved launcher program for Mac OS X that allows users to quickly launch Google searches, launch applications, make quick calculations and more. Now, the developers behind Alfred have revealed in a blog post one of the new features for version 2.0.


The feature is called Workflows and allows users to create advanced functions to make Alfred even more useful. Some examples are the ability to research a film before watching or uploading photos to Flickr.

Movies weren’t created equal, so before I start watching a movie, I can search for “movie dark knight rises” to decide whether or not I should watch it. This will launch a YouTube search for the trailer in Chrome (because I don’t have Flash installed in Safari), an IMDB search using a default web search, and a Rotten Tomatoes custom search I’ve created.

Alfred 2.0 goes into beta in January and prospective beta testers can take part by upgrading to a “Mega Supporter” account.

Adobe Updates Photoshop Lightroom With Retina Support

Adobe has updated Photoshop Lightroom, its prosumer image editor, with retina display support. Photoshop and Illustrator CS6 were upgraded with similar support earlier this week.

NewImage

What’s new

• HiDPI support within the Library and Develop Modules. HiDPI provides support for Retina-enabled Macs.
• Additional raw file support for 20 cameras including the Canon EOS 6D, Nikon D600 and Olympus PEN E-PL5
• Corrections and bug fixes for issues introduced in previous versions of Lightroom.

Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 4 is available on the Mac App Store for $149.99. [Direct Link]