Apple to Open First Retail Store and Resume Online Sales in Indonesia

NZweek reports (via The Next Web) that government officials in Indonesia have revealed that Apple has submitted an application outlining plans to relaunch its online store in the country, to be followed by the opening of its first Indonesian retail store in Jakarta.

Chatib Basri, BKPM chairman, said BKPM has given official permission to Apple relating to its plan to open online store in Indonesia. “We have approved their (Apple) application,” he said here on Tuesday.

Apple online store in Indonesia is expected to give shorter supply chain and distribution of its products.

Azhar Lubis, deputy chairman of BKPM said Apple will open its store in Indonesia’s capital city, Jakarta. “The investment worth around 2 million to 3 million U.S. dollars,” he said.

The Next Web notes that Apple previously operated an online store for Indonesia but shut down the store in early 2011 due to issues with shipping products from the store’s central hub in Singapore. The store currently remains online only to provide pricing information and connect customers to resellers.


Apple has been focused on expanding its international retail store presence, and the company revealed in job listings late last year that it is making plans for its first stores in Brazil and Turkey. Apple has also been said to be looking at expanding sales in Russia.

Shipping Estimates for 21.5-Inch iMac Begin Slipping to 2-3 Weeks

Shipping estimates for new orders of 21.5-inch iMac models began slipping in Apple’s online stores in many European countries such as the United Kingdom today, moving from 7-10 business days to 2-3 weeks. The changes have not yet propagated to stores for other regions.


Estimates for the 21.5-inch models had remained steady at 7-10 business days since just after they became available for sale late last year. Apple has also been quoting even longer estimates for the 27-inch models, which are reportedly seeing more significant issues with display production due to a new lamination process. Estimates for new 27-inch iMac orders remain at 3-4 weeks for the time being, essentially in line with their status since just after pre-orders went live.

(Thanks, Neil!)

Related roundup: iMac

Tim Cook Ordered to Give Deposition in Employee-Poaching Ban Antitrust Case

Bloomberg is reporting that Apple CEO Tim Cook has been ordered by U.S. District Judge Lucy Koh to give a deposition in a lawsuit claiming that Apple and five other companies entered deals not to recruit each other’s employees.

Koh told lawyers yesterday that Apple founder Steve Jobs was copied on e-mails at issue in the case, and that she found it “hard to believe” that Cook, as Apple’s chief operating officer at the time in question, wouldn’t have been consulted about such agreements.

The judge said she was disappointed that senior executives at the companies involved hadn’t been deposed before yesterday’s hearing over whether she should certify the case as a group lawsuit.


The case goes back to 2005 and alleges that Apple, Adobe, Pixar, Lucasfilm, Google, Intel and Intuit had agreements not to poach employees from the companies that were privy to the agreements. Employees were free to apply at jobs at any of the companies on their own volition, however.

The agreements were investigated in 2010 by the Justice Department and the claims were eventually settled, with the companies agreeing not to enter employee-poaching bans for five years.

The current lawsuit is a class-action civil suit by employees who say they were harmed by the anti-competitive actions of the companies within the agreement.

Black Pixel’s Comparison App ‘Kaleidoscope 2’ Goes Live on Mac App Store

Black Pixel today released its first major in-house app, Kaleidoscope 2. The app that helps coders, writers and others to compare the differences in folders, images, text, and more. The app was released as a beta back in November.NewImage

At the time, The Next Web spoke with former Apple employee Michael Jurewitz and the rest of the Black Pixel team about Kaleidoscope 2:

Kaleidoscope 2 is a lovely comparison app that allows you to take two or more files, folders or images and compare them to one another. The applications are broad, with benefits that swing from developers on one end to those simply looking to compare two images side-by-side. It has full integration with Git, Subversion, Mercurial, and Bazaar. The app can be used as the default conflict resolver for code with its command line integration or simply to check the changed passages in a collaborative word document. It’s beautifully designed, fast and wonderful to use. It’s become an essential part of my toolkit already.

Kaleidoscope
Black Pixel acquired Kaleidoscope and Versions last year, as well as the popular RSS reader NetNewsWire. Version 2 of Kaleidoscope is the first major bit of software that Black Pixel has put its own name on — previously, the company focused on developing apps for outside clients.

Kaleidoscope 2 is currently available on the Mac App Store [Direct Link], directly from Black Pixel or as a 15-day trial. It’s available for $35 through January 30th, after which it will be $70.

A Behind the Scenes Look at a Steve Jobs Keynote

Former Apple employee Don Melton has been sharing a unique look behind the scenes of the Safari development team. Melton was the team leader on both the Safari and WebKit products that are now used by millions of users on iOS, the Mac, and Windows.
NewImage
Previously, Melton explained how the Safari name came about, and the tale of Safari’s User Agent string and the strategies his team used to keep the project under wraps.

Today, he shared details of the launch of Safari some ten years ago at the Macworld Expo in 2003. One of the more revealing sections of the piece looks behind the scenes at Steve Jobs’ rehearsals for his presentation and some of the things that could have gone wrong.

Of course, thanks to Jobs’ impeccable preparation, the Safari presentation — and everything else that was revealed that day — went off without a hitch.

Until I watched that video I found and posted of the Macworld keynote, I had completely forgotten what else was announced that day. Which is pretty sad considering I saw Steve rehearse the whole thing at least four times.

But you have to realize I was totally focused on Safari. And Scott Forstall, my boss, wanted me at those rehearsals in case something went wrong with it.

There’s nothing that can fill your underwear faster than seeing your product fail during a Steve Jobs demo.

One of my concerns at the time was network reliability. So, I brought Ken Kocienda, the first Safari engineer, with me to troubleshoot since he wrote so much of our networking code. If necessary, Ken could also diagnose and duct tape any other part of Safari too. He coined one of our team aphorisms, “If it doesn’t fit, you’re not shoving hard enough.”

[…]

Most of the time during those rehearsals, Ken and I had nothing to do except sit in the then empty audience and watch The Master Presenter at work — crafting his keynote. What a privilege to be a spectator during that process. At Apple, we were actually all students, not just spectators. When I see other companies clumsily announce products these days, I realize again how much the rest of the world lost now that Steve is gone.

The full article is worth a read for anyone who wants a peek behind the Apple curtain.

Tweetdeck Updated With Predictive Typing and Performance Upgrades

Twitter has updated its Tweetdeck client with a number of new features, including the ability to get Tweet embed code straight from the application, a new predictive typing feature, and “performance upgrades for displaying multiple high-velocity columns”.

TweetDeck 1
Reports The Next Web:

The update includes changes made to the Chrome version of the app before Christmas, and one of the most visual changes is the addition of ‘typeahead’ when searching, to offer predictions for what you’ll be writing. This also acts as a people search, giving you a list of accounts in your Twitter community that match the text entered.

Twitter says there have been more than 90 fixes and updates from the prior version and Twitter power users may want to give the updated app another look.

Tweetdeck is available free on the Mac App Store. [Direct Link]

Firefox For Mac Gets Updated With Retina Support

Mozilla today released version 18 of Firefox, adding Retina support for Apple’s line of Retina MacBook Pros.

Safari, Opera, and Google Chrome implemented Retina months ago, leaving Firefox as the last of the major browsers to receive a Retina update. Without Retina support, both website text and images on Firefox appeared fuzzy and hard to read.

Firefox 18 also includes the following updates, changes and fixes:

-Faster JavaScript performance via IonMonkey compiler

-Support for Retina Display on OS X 10.7 and up

-Preliminary support for WebRTC

-Experience better image quality with our new HTML scaling algorithm

-Performance improvements around tab switching

-Support for new DOM property window.devicePixelRatio

-Improvement in startup time through smart handling of signed extension certificates

-Support for W3C touch events implemented, taking the place of MozTouch events

-Disable insecure content loading on HTTPS pages

-Improved responsiveness for users on proxies

Firefox 18 can be downloaded from the Mozilla website.